ESSR 2019 / P-0019
A practical guide to identify the major sensory nerves of the groin on ultrasound
Congress: ESSR 2019
Poster No.: P-0019
Type: Educational Poster
Keywords: Education and training, Education, Ultrasound, Neuroradiology peripheral nerve, Anatomy
Authors: K. Vanderdood1, H. Al Bulushi2, M. Adriaensen3; 1Sittard-Geleen/NL, 2Muscat/OM, 3Heerlen/NL
DOI:10.26044/essr2019/P-0019

Background

 

The ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric, genitofemoral, obturator and pudendal nerve are the major sensory nerves of the groin and may be involved in the chronic groin pain.

 

 

1.The ilioinguinal (II) nerve supplies the skin of the superomedial thigh, the skin over the root of the penis and anterior scrotum in men and the mons pubis and labium majus in the female.

 

2.The iliohypogastric (IH) nerve supplies the skin over the lower part of the rectus abdominis or mons pubis.

 

3.The genital branch of the genitofemoral  (GF) nerve supplies the skin of the anterolateral scrotum (or labium majus) and contains a motor branch to the cremaster muscle . The femoral branch innervates the skin of the anterior thigh below the inguinal ligament or femoral triangle.

 

Because of their course, these 3 nerves (II, IH, GF) are at risk to injury from lower abdomen incision leading to  the so-called border nerve pain  syndrome, as they  supply the skin between the abdomen and the thigh.

 

The many variations and free communication between the sensory branches of these nerves, implies the examination of these 3 nerves as a whole in the proper clinical setting.

 

 

4.The obturator nerve supplies the skin of the medial thigh and motor innervation of the adductor muscles.

 

5.The pudendal nerve gives rise to 3  terminal branches including the genital nerve suppling  the skin of the penis (or clitoris), the perineal area and the posterior scrotum or labia majora.

 

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